nationalaquarium:

Did you know? By turning off the tap while you brush your teeth, you can save 200 gallons of water a month. That’s enough water to fill FIVE bathtubs!

Join our ‪#‎48DaysofBlue‬ movement and pledge today for a blue tomorrow!

montereybayaquarium:

Have plans for Saturday? Get your weekend started with an artisanal chocolate tasting, beekeeping lessons or a party with Alton Brown! Tickets still available for our Cooking for Solutions Salon Series and more! 

Learn more

neaq:

The Voyage of a Minnow: This sweet skateboard deck (called The Minnow) started life as a fishing net. A small company in Chile is working to recycle retired fishing nets, keeping this harmful debris out of the oceans, and turning one fishing boat’s trash into someone else’s sidewalk treasure.

Find out how the Aquarium is supporting this cool mission to protect our blue planet.

neaq:

WATCH: One generation of prominent environmental leaders with Massachusetts roots had a conversation with the emerging generation of ocean stewards about their Earth Day inspirations.

More

Our friends in Boston doing great things with their local youth! Don’t forget that the aquarium holds group sessions for teen and young children every month! Sign up at the new Climate Exhibit at the aquarium!

montereybayaquarium:

Snack for a cause! Ocean’s Halo Seaweed Chips donates two percent of its profits to our Children’s Education Fund, which helps us inspire the next generation of ocean stewards.

Learn more

Don’t forget that voting with your dollar counts a lot! Help make yourself and the world healthy with smart consumer habits!

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
  2. Aperture: f/5
  3. Exposure: 1/800th
  4. Focal Length: 100mm
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf
staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf

staceythinx:

Some of the incredible photos by David Doubilet and Jennifer Hayes featured in National Geographic’s photo gallery The Generous Gulf

Log Lunch usually brings out our favorite aquarium staffers out to socialize, stop by for some great conversation and possible climate talks!

nationalaquarium:

Help us caption this fishy photobomb from Flickr user Lance Rogers! #CaptionContest

"Hey Fred, why so blue?!"

If you want to try, reblog or visit NEAQ’s Tumblr, linked above!

montereybayaquarium:

Life and Death, and Harbor Seals
(This guest blog was written by Thom Akeman, a volunteer with Bay Net and a resident of Pacific Grove. Bay Net naturalists interpret wildlife for visitors along the shores of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. )
This spring started out as the best harbor seal pupping season on the Monterey Peninsula in years. In 2013, too many people climbed down onto beaches near the Aquarium, in Pacific Grove, where mother harbor seals came ashore to deliver and raise their pups. The result: pups abandoned by their mothers before they could survive on their own.
Community volunteers put a lot of hours into getting a new city ordinance and temporary fencing to protect defenseless seal pups during these critical months. The temporary fencing went up shortly after the first successful birth in late March. After that came a regular parade of new pups! On Easter Sunday 2014, we counted 64 newly born harbor seals on the beaches of Pacific Grove, with only a few losses.
It was a glorious Easter. Lots of still-pregnant seals were rolling around on the beaches beside the nursing moms and healthy pups. Then about noon, unexpectedly high surf sent waves crashing onto the beaches. New new pups who weren’t yet strong swimmers were pulled into the churning ocean, along with their moms. 
Spectators on the bluffs watched in silence as moms and pups went through life-or-death struggles to stay together in the powerful waves. The last pair to be seen in one area were separated for several long minutes, fate unknown. When the pup landed on a narrow sand strip, and a minute later the mom emerged to reunite with the little guy, applause broke out along the shoreline. The mom and pup rested a bit, then took off and surfaced on a larger beach nearby 90 minutes later.
At the end of the day, volunteer docents with a local organization named Bay Net found 51 of the 64 seal pairs back in one of the rookeries. A search of isolated beaches the next day found four of the missing pups; and five more the day after that. 
The search continues for the missing pups. Meanwhile, many still-pregnant seals deliver new babies on the beach – in sight of people, but safely out of reach thanks to the temporary barriers.
And if the wind and waves cooperate, this could still be the best harbor seal pupping season in years.
Listen to our Coastal Trail Audio Tour and learn more about where to see harbor seal pups at the Pocket Beach near Hopkins Marine Station.
Find out how to get involved with Bay Net.
Photos courtesy Kim M. Worrell.

Although we aquarium staffers are sometimes sad we don’t live on the coast near Monterey, stories like these make is seem like we are right there with them! If you want to learn about what fun volunteer projects the aquarium is hosting this summer here in town, contact or visit the new climate change exhibit Monday through Friday. montereybayaquarium:

Life and Death, and Harbor Seals
(This guest blog was written by Thom Akeman, a volunteer with Bay Net and a resident of Pacific Grove. Bay Net naturalists interpret wildlife for visitors along the shores of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. )
This spring started out as the best harbor seal pupping season on the Monterey Peninsula in years. In 2013, too many people climbed down onto beaches near the Aquarium, in Pacific Grove, where mother harbor seals came ashore to deliver and raise their pups. The result: pups abandoned by their mothers before they could survive on their own.
Community volunteers put a lot of hours into getting a new city ordinance and temporary fencing to protect defenseless seal pups during these critical months. The temporary fencing went up shortly after the first successful birth in late March. After that came a regular parade of new pups! On Easter Sunday 2014, we counted 64 newly born harbor seals on the beaches of Pacific Grove, with only a few losses.
It was a glorious Easter. Lots of still-pregnant seals were rolling around on the beaches beside the nursing moms and healthy pups. Then about noon, unexpectedly high surf sent waves crashing onto the beaches. New new pups who weren’t yet strong swimmers were pulled into the churning ocean, along with their moms. 
Spectators on the bluffs watched in silence as moms and pups went through life-or-death struggles to stay together in the powerful waves. The last pair to be seen in one area were separated for several long minutes, fate unknown. When the pup landed on a narrow sand strip, and a minute later the mom emerged to reunite with the little guy, applause broke out along the shoreline. The mom and pup rested a bit, then took off and surfaced on a larger beach nearby 90 minutes later.
At the end of the day, volunteer docents with a local organization named Bay Net found 51 of the 64 seal pairs back in one of the rookeries. A search of isolated beaches the next day found four of the missing pups; and five more the day after that. 
The search continues for the missing pups. Meanwhile, many still-pregnant seals deliver new babies on the beach – in sight of people, but safely out of reach thanks to the temporary barriers.
And if the wind and waves cooperate, this could still be the best harbor seal pupping season in years.
Listen to our Coastal Trail Audio Tour and learn more about where to see harbor seal pups at the Pocket Beach near Hopkins Marine Station.
Find out how to get involved with Bay Net.
Photos courtesy Kim M. Worrell.

Although we aquarium staffers are sometimes sad we don’t live on the coast near Monterey, stories like these make is seem like we are right there with them! If you want to learn about what fun volunteer projects the aquarium is hosting this summer here in town, contact or visit the new climate change exhibit Monday through Friday. montereybayaquarium:

Life and Death, and Harbor Seals
(This guest blog was written by Thom Akeman, a volunteer with Bay Net and a resident of Pacific Grove. Bay Net naturalists interpret wildlife for visitors along the shores of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. )
This spring started out as the best harbor seal pupping season on the Monterey Peninsula in years. In 2013, too many people climbed down onto beaches near the Aquarium, in Pacific Grove, where mother harbor seals came ashore to deliver and raise their pups. The result: pups abandoned by their mothers before they could survive on their own.
Community volunteers put a lot of hours into getting a new city ordinance and temporary fencing to protect defenseless seal pups during these critical months. The temporary fencing went up shortly after the first successful birth in late March. After that came a regular parade of new pups! On Easter Sunday 2014, we counted 64 newly born harbor seals on the beaches of Pacific Grove, with only a few losses.
It was a glorious Easter. Lots of still-pregnant seals were rolling around on the beaches beside the nursing moms and healthy pups. Then about noon, unexpectedly high surf sent waves crashing onto the beaches. New new pups who weren’t yet strong swimmers were pulled into the churning ocean, along with their moms. 
Spectators on the bluffs watched in silence as moms and pups went through life-or-death struggles to stay together in the powerful waves. The last pair to be seen in one area were separated for several long minutes, fate unknown. When the pup landed on a narrow sand strip, and a minute later the mom emerged to reunite with the little guy, applause broke out along the shoreline. The mom and pup rested a bit, then took off and surfaced on a larger beach nearby 90 minutes later.
At the end of the day, volunteer docents with a local organization named Bay Net found 51 of the 64 seal pairs back in one of the rookeries. A search of isolated beaches the next day found four of the missing pups; and five more the day after that. 
The search continues for the missing pups. Meanwhile, many still-pregnant seals deliver new babies on the beach – in sight of people, but safely out of reach thanks to the temporary barriers.
And if the wind and waves cooperate, this could still be the best harbor seal pupping season in years.
Listen to our Coastal Trail Audio Tour and learn more about where to see harbor seal pups at the Pocket Beach near Hopkins Marine Station.
Find out how to get involved with Bay Net.
Photos courtesy Kim M. Worrell.

Although we aquarium staffers are sometimes sad we don’t live on the coast near Monterey, stories like these make is seem like we are right there with them! If you want to learn about what fun volunteer projects the aquarium is hosting this summer here in town, contact or visit the new climate change exhibit Monday through Friday.

montereybayaquarium:

Life and Death, and Harbor Seals

(This guest blog was written by Thom Akeman, a volunteer with Bay Net and a resident of Pacific Grove. Bay Net naturalists interpret wildlife for visitors along the shores of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. )

This spring started out as the best harbor seal pupping season on the Monterey Peninsula in years. In 2013, too many people climbed down onto beaches near the Aquarium, in Pacific Grove, where mother harbor seals came ashore to deliver and raise their pups. The result: pups abandoned by their mothers before they could survive on their own.

Community volunteers put a lot of hours into getting a new city ordinance and temporary fencing to protect defenseless seal pups during these critical months. The temporary fencing went up shortly after the first successful birth in late March. After that came a regular parade of new pups! On Easter Sunday 2014, we counted 64 newly born harbor seals on the beaches of Pacific Grove, with only a few losses.

It was a glorious Easter. Lots of still-pregnant seals were rolling around on the beaches beside the nursing moms and healthy pups. Then about noon, unexpectedly high surf sent waves crashing onto the beaches. New new pups who weren’t yet strong swimmers were pulled into the churning ocean, along with their moms. 

Spectators on the bluffs watched in silence as moms and pups went through life-or-death struggles to stay together in the powerful waves. The last pair to be seen in one area were separated for several long minutes, fate unknown. When the pup landed on a narrow sand strip, and a minute later the mom emerged to reunite with the little guy, applause broke out along the shoreline. The mom and pup rested a bit, then took off and surfaced on a larger beach nearby 90 minutes later.

At the end of the day, volunteer docents with a local organization named Bay Net found 51 of the 64 seal pairs back in one of the rookeries. A search of isolated beaches the next day found four of the missing pups; and five more the day after that. 

The search continues for the missing pups. Meanwhile, many still-pregnant seals deliver new babies on the beach – in sight of people, but safely out of reach thanks to the temporary barriers.

And if the wind and waves cooperate, this could still be the best harbor seal pupping season in years.

Listen to our Coastal Trail Audio Tour and learn more about where to see harbor seal pups at the Pocket Beach near Hopkins Marine Station.

Find out how to get involved with Bay Net.

Photos courtesy Kim M. Worrell.

Although we aquarium staffers are sometimes sad we don’t live on the coast near Monterey, stories like these make is seem like we are right there with them! 

If you want to learn about what fun volunteer projects the aquarium is hosting this summer here in town, contact or visit the new climate change exhibit Monday through Friday.

Here in Williams we have no shortage of green foliage, but every little bit counts! Williams Environmental Science Professors Frank Paint and Dave Scott are always excited to give suggestions on tree choice and maintenance if you’re just beginning. Call or Visit the new Climate exhibit for contact information.

Here in Williams we have no shortage of green foliage, but every little bit counts! Williams Environmental Science Professors Frank Paint and Dave Scott are always excited to give suggestions on tree choice and maintenance if you’re just beginning. Call or Visit the new Climate exhibit for contact information.